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Lay users embrace the Cloud: Gartner study

Mumbai, June 25, 2012 — Lay consumers have given a thumbs -up to the cloud -- and are putting more and more of their content up there, find analysts at Gartner. While just 7 percent of consumer content was stored in the cloud in 2011, this is seen to grow to 36 percent in 2016.
Says Shalini Verma, principal research analyst at Gartner: "Historically, consumers have generally stored content ontheir PCs, but as we enter the post-PC era, consumers are using multipleconnected devices, the majority of which are equipped with cameras. This isleading to a massive increase in new user-generated content that requires storage. With the emergence of the personal cloud, this fast-growing consumerdigital content will quickly get disaggregated from connected devices."
The increased adoption of camera-equipped smartphones and tablets is allowing users to capture huge amounts of photos and videos. Gartner predicts that worldwide consumer digital storage needs will grow from 329 exabytes in 2011 to 4.1 zettabytes in 2016. This includes digital content stored in PCs,smartphones, tablets, hard-disk drives (HDDs), network attached storage (NAS)and cloud repositories. An exabyte is 1 billion gigabytes or 1000 petabytes. A zettabyte is 1000 exabytes.
The bulk of the cloud storage needs of consumers in the near term, will be met by social media sites such as Facebook, which offer free storagespace for uploading photos and videos for social sharing. Ms. Verma said that while online backup services are the most well-known cloud storage providers,their total storage allocated to consumers and "prosumers" is small relative to that maintained by social media sites.
Average storage per household will grow from 464 gigabytes in 2011 to 3.3 terabytes in 2016. In 2012, Gartner believes that the adoption ofcamera-equipped tablets and smartphones will drive consumer storage needs. In the first half of 2012, a shortage in supply of Hard Disk Drives as a result of the floods in Thailand provided an impetus for cloud storage adoption, leading to an unusual overall growth rate between 2011 and 2012.
On-premises storage will remain the main repository of consumerdigital content, although Gartner predicts that its share will progressively drop from 93 percent in 2011 to 64 percent in 2016 as the direct-to-cloud model becomes more mainstream. Cloud storage will grow at an aggressive pace duringthis period. In the Asia/Pacific region, Japan and South Korea will witness thehighest growth in cloud storage, where CSPs have been offering online storageand sync services for some years.
"As storage becomes a part of the personalcloud, it will become further commoditized. Therefore, online storage and sync companies need to have a strategic rethink about their future approach" feels Verma.

Additional information is available in the Gartner report “Forecast: Consumer Digital Storage needs 2010-2016" 




    


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Lay users embrace the Cloud: Gartner study
by Ahmed on   31,  2012
  "These devices are one of the must-haves for the mdeorn home entertainment center or home networks. They can perform multiple tasks from backups to media streaming. If you have a network, and just want a common place to store files, this will do it. Need a streaming media server for your new TV or networked media player? Ditto. Automatic network backup? Check. I'm using it for storing photos and videos. Since digital photos are only virtual (no more negatives for safety!), backups are a must. I keep several backups, as photography is a hobby and a job. I also have media streaming devices hooked up to my TV's, and they can play video, audio and show photos from the web and attached network devices. This device shows up on the list of network devices, and it's a few clicks to navigate to the media desired. Streaming works perfectly. Everything you need is in the box. A short networking cable, power supply, the network drive and installation CD. Installation is easy and straight forward. Attach the power and network cables, sit down at your PC, drop in the install CD, and follow the steps. You can't just plug in and go you need to run the install CD. This is not just a drive it's also a mini file server. You need to set up permissions and user accounts. The first thing the installer did was check for an update. One was available, so I let it install it. This took about 25 minutes. This step can be skipped, but it's always a good idea to install updates. After that was completed I created a couple of user accounts quick and easy. You can create private storage accounts, public, and pick who has access to what accounts. So little Billy can't see his sister's stuff, or each employee can have a private and public storage area. Really handy and well executed. Also included is backup software PC, Mac and automatic network. I did not install the software. I've used it in the past, and prefer manual backups. Case: If you know WD products, you'll notice that they all have the same look. Their media streamer looks like a miniature version of this unit. It's identical to their external drives. The user interface is browser based, so is accessible to anyone on the network with admin access. I've been using it for a couple of weeks now, and have not encountered any issues. Only one caveat when the drive arrives, you have 900 gig of storage. It may be a one TB drive, but only 900 gig is available. Warnings: 1) When you setup the drive, make a note of the IP address. The instructions for accessing via the network in My Computer in the manual don't work in Windows 7. You need to use the browser and enter the IP address. The shortcut also works differently in different OS. Windows 7 double clicking on the icon opens the shared folder. On XP it opens the dashboard / control panel for the mybook. 2) The only interface is the network port. Don't expect to attach anything to the device except the network cable and power. Comments: The interface, although web based, is a little clunky. For the price, you can't go wrong great bang for the buck. "
     
Lay users embrace the Cloud: Gartner study
by Ahmed on   31,  2012
  "These devices are one of the must-haves for the mdeorn home entertainment center or home networks. They can perform multiple tasks from backups to media streaming. If you have a network, and just want a common place to store files, this will do it. Need a streaming media server for your new TV or networked media player? Ditto. Automatic network backup? Check. I''m using it for storing photos and videos. Since digital photos are only virtual (no more negatives for safety!), backups are a must. I keep several backups, as photography is a hobby and a job. I also have media streaming devices hooked up to my TV''s, and they can play video, audio and show photos from the web and attached network devices. This device shows up on the list of network devices, and it''s a few clicks to navigate to the media desired. Streaming works perfectly. Everything you need is in the box. A short networking cable, power supply, the network drive and installation CD. Installation is easy and straight forward. Attach the power and network cables, sit down at your PC, drop in the install CD, and follow the steps. You can''t just plug in and go you need to run the install CD. This is not just a drive it''s also a mini file server. You need to set up permissions and user accounts. The first thing the installer did was check for an update. One was available, so I let it install it. This took about 25 minutes. This step can be skipped, but it''s always a good idea to install updates. After that was completed I created a couple of user accounts quick and easy. You can create private storage accounts, public, and pick who has access to what accounts. So little Billy can''t see his sister''s stuff, or each employee can have a private and public storage area. Really handy and well executed. Also included is backup software PC, Mac and automatic network. I did not install the software. I''ve used it in the past, and prefer manual backups. Case: If you know WD products, you''ll notice that they all have the same look. Their media streamer looks like a miniature version of this unit. It''s identical to their external drives. The user interface is browser based, so is accessible to anyone on the network with admin access. I''ve been using it for a couple of weeks now, and have not encountered any issues. Only one caveat when the drive arrives, you have 900 gig of storage. It may be a one TB drive, but only 900 gig is available. Warnings: 1) When you setup the drive, make a note of the IP address. The instructions for accessing via the network in My Computer in the manual don''t work in Windows 7. You need to use the browser and enter the IP address. The shortcut also works differently in different OS. Windows 7 double clicking on the icon opens the shared folder. On XP it opens the dashboard / control panel for the mybook. 2) The only interface is the network port. Don''t expect to attach anything to the device except the network cable and power. Comments: The interface, although web based, is a little clunky. For the price, you can''t go wrong great bang for the buck. "